Jigs & jigging

Jigs & jigging

The razor gang's about Before braid, kingfish jigging was all about speed, short, stubby muck-metal jigs and monofilament line. Now jiggers practise Japanese jigging or mechanical jigging. Working both arms like locomotive push rods while winding, is the best way to describe mechanical jigging. The jig stutters its way up through the fish zone, which means it spends more time in the fish zone. The lure has much more movement and fish-bite-me appeal. Contemporary jigs that catch big fish are up to 35cm long and are all the colours of the rainbow; good ones have a lumo glow. Start the day big with jig size 420g, drop down in size to 300g if the fishing is hard and if the boat drift speed allows . Braid. Don't muck about. Use quality 50 or 80lb braid (PE 4-8) because you don't want to lose a big fish or leave it with a 300-400g mouth-piercing ornament The hook is 9/0 or 11/0 and is fixed to the top of the jig by an assist cord split ring solid ring arrangement. The 80-130lb leader is connected to the solid ring so you are in a direct line to the hook. The jig flails around independently, attached to the solid ring by a grunty, high-tensile split ring. Jigging gloves are a must, for both protection from the braid and blisters from the sometimes frantic and repetitive winding action. Keeping the rod butt tucked by your elbow will reduce fatigue and impart enough lure action to see you through the day. There's only one critter that likes a jig more than a kingfish and that's the "razor gang" barracouta. Here's a good tip to avoid them: let your mates drop their jig first, so the razor gang will chase theirs, a few seconds delay might get you through!